Overview:

This article serves as a supplement to the general Creating Quiz Questions article. There are numerous question types available for D2L Quizzes, Surveys, and Self-Assessments. While the general setup is similar, each question type is slightly different. This document covers the setup of each question type in detail. For a more general explanation, see the Creating Quiz Questions article.


The Question Types

The following are available question types in the D2L system. Click on each type for more information on its setup.


True/False (T/F) Multiple Choice (M/C)
Multi Select (M-S)
Long Answer (LA)
Short Answer (SA)
Multi-Short Answer (MSA)
Fill in the Blank (FIB)
Matching (MAT)
Ordering (ORD)
Arithmetic (2+2)
Significant Figures (x10)
Likert (LIK)



True/False (T/F)

True or false questions present a statement which respondents must determine to be correct or incorrect.


SAMPLE:



SETUP:

  1. Select “True or False Question (T/F)” from the list of question types.

  2. Assign the point value for this question and then enter the question statement in the “Question Text” field.


  3. Select your enumeration preference. That is, what (if anything) do you want to appear before the answer choices (a, b, c or I, ii, iii, etc.).

    Set the Style for the choices – vertical, horizontal, or drop-down.


  4. Set the correct answer weight to 100%. Leave the incorrect answer set to 0%. Enter optional feedback for each answer choice. Remember, if you want students to be able to see question feedback, you must enable it in the Quiz Submission View setup.


  5. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  6. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another True/False question, click “Save and New.”


Multiple Choice (M/C)

Multiple Choice (M/C) questions present a statement or question with a list of possible answers, in which respondents must choose the best possible answer. Multiple Choice questions differ from multi-select question in that only one answer can be selected for each question.

If you create a multiple choice question that has more than one possible solution, answers can be weighted according to the correctness of each possible answer.


For example, if two choices are accepted as correct, both can be weighted at 100%, while the remaining choices can be weighted at 0%. If all five answer choices are partially correct, you can weight some more than others, assigning the most weight to the best answer.



SAMPLE:





SETUP:

  1. Select “Multiple Choice Question (MC)” from the list of question types.

  2. Assign a point value for the question and then enter the question in the “Question Text” field.


  3. Select your enumeration preference. That is, what (if anything) do you want to appear before the answer choices (a, b, c or I, ii, iii, etc.).

    Set the Style for the choices – vertical, horizontal, or drop-down.

    Also determine if you want to randomize options. This setting will only randomize the answer options, not the quiz questions. To randomize quiz questions, see the Creating a Random Question Quiz article.


  4. Enter your answer options in the “Value” fields. You can also enter feedback for each option, but remember if you want users to be able to view the feedback, you must enable it in Submission View during quiz setup.

    Assign the correct answer a weight of 100%. If all other answers are incorrect, leave their weight at 0%.

    The standard option set is four, but you can add additional options by enter the number of desired additional options and clicking “Add Option.”


  5. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  6. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Multiple Choice question, click “Save and New.”

Multi-Select (M-S)

Multi-Select (M-S) questions require respondents to identify one or more correct answers in a list of possible answers. Unlike Multiple Choice (MC) questions, multi-select questions enable you to choose a grading format and allow users to select more than one answer.


SAMPLE:





SETUP:

  1. Select “Multi-Select Question (M-S)” from the list of question types.

  2. Assign a point value for the question and then enter the question in the “Question Text” field.


  3. Select your enumeration preference. That is, what (if anything) do you want to appear before the answer choices (a, b, c or I, ii, iii, etc.).

    Set the Style for the choices – vertical or horizontal.

    Set the grading preferences.

    All of nothing – Users receive the total point value if they select all the correct answers or else they receive none at all.

    Right minus wrong – Users receive points equal to the number of right answer they choose minus the number of incorrect answers they choose. To determine how much each answer is worth, the system takes the total number of points assigned to the question and divides it by the total number of answer options.

    Correct answers – The total point value is divided equally among all possible answers. Users receive equally weighted points for each correct answer.

    Also determine if you want to randomize options. This setting will only randomize the answer options, not the quiz questions.


  4. Enter the answer options and check the correct answers. You must select at least one correct option in order for the question to be auto-graded.

    To add additional options, enter the number of options and then click “Add Option.”



  5. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  6. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Multi-Select question, click “Save and New.”


Written Response (WR)

Written Response (WR) questions require respondents to write detailed answers in response to open-ended questions/prompts. You can enable users to respond in multiple sentences, paragraph answers, or mathematical explanations and calculations. This question type cannot be auto-graded.


SAMPLE:




SETUP:

  1. Select “Long Answer Question (LA)” from the list of question types.

  2. Enter a point value for the question and then enter the question or prompt in the “Question Text” field.


  3. Select the number of “Rows” and “Columns” to control the input field’s display size for users.

    If desired, enter “Initial Text” to display to respondents above the answer text box.

    Also determine if users will be able to utilize the HTML Editor editing tools when crafting their response.


  4. If desired, fill in the “Answer Key” field for grading purposes. This will not be displayed to students, but can help instructors remember key points when evaluating responses.


  5. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  6. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Long Answer question, click “Save and New.”

Short Answer (SA)

Short Answer (SA) question types require respondents to create one word or brief sentence answers in response to open-ended questions.


SAMPLE:





SETUP:

  1. Select “Short Answer Question (SA)” from the question type list.

  2. Enter a point value for the question and then enter the question in the “Question Text” field.


  3. Determine the response field size by adjusting the “Rows” and “Columns.”

    Enter the desired answer in the “Answer” field and assign it a weight.

    Determine the evaluation method:

    Case insensitive – Auto-grading searches for a matching character pattern in the answer text with or without letter case correctness.

    Case sensitive – Auto-grading searches for a matching character pattern in the answer text that must have letter case correctness.

    Regular Expression – Auto-grading uses meta-characters to search for one or more matching strings in the answer text’s character pattern. What you set as meta-character parameters helps determine letter case sensitivity. For more information on regular expression, see D2L’s Understanding Regular Expression explanation.

    You can add additional accepted answers by clicking “Add Answer.” You can also add additional blanks by click “Add Blank.”


  4. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  5. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Short Answer question, click “Save and New.”


Multi-Short Answer (MSA)

Multi-Short Answer (MSA) questions require respondents to answer a multi-solution question and input their answers into individual input boxes. The answer provided by a respondent in each input box is checked against each possible answer stored in the answer fields.

For example, the question, “Name 3 state capitals” will display three input boxes to users. Each answer users submit will be checked against 51 possible correct answers that are stored in the answer fields.

Multi-Short answer questions differ from Short Answer (SA) questions in that the Multi-Short answer question enables you to create multiple answer boxes which all relate to one answer set.


SAMPLE:




SETUP:

  1. Select “Multi-Short Answer Question (MSA)” from the list of question types.

  2. Enter a point value for the question and then enter the question in the “Question Text” field.


  3. Determine the number and size of the input boxes by adjusting the “Rows” and “Columns.” The number of input boxes should match the number of responses you are requesting. For example, in the question, “Name 3 states,” there should be 3 input boxes.


  4. Enter the possible answers in the “Answer” fields. Each possible answer should be entered into its own field. To add additional possible answers, click “Add Answer.”

    Set the weight for each answer. The question value is reflected by a 100% weight. It is recommended that each possible answer’s weight calculation equals 100% of the answers required by the question. For example, in the “Name 3 states” question, each response is worth 33.3% to total a 100%.

    Set the evaluation method for each answer:

    Case insensitive – Auto-grading searches for a matching character pattern in the answer text with or without letter case correctness.

    Case sensitive – Auto-grading searches for a matching character pattern in the answer text that must have letter case correctness.

    Regular Expression – Auto-grading uses meta-characters to search for one or more matching strings in the answer text’s character pattern. What you set as meta-character parameters helps determine letter case sensitivity. For more information on regular expression, see D2L’s Understanding Regular Expression explanation.


  5. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  6. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Multi-Short Answer question, click “Save and New.”

    Note: 
    When saving a question with more possible answers than required responses, you will get the warning: “The maximum weight on this question is currently more than 100%. Statistics for this question will not be available. Are you sure you are done?” Click “Yes” to continue if you do not require statistics for this question.


Fill in the Blank (FIB)

Fill in the Blank (FIB) questions require respondents to fill in one or more missing words for an incomplete sentence, statement, phrase, list, or key terminology.


SAMPLE:





SETUP:

  1. Select “Fill in the Blanks Question (FIB)” from the list of question types.

  2. Enter a point value for the question.



  3. Enter the first part of your question statement in the first “Text” field.

    Enter the answer that ‘fills in the blank’ in the Answer” field. Also assign the appropriate weight and evaluation method.

    Then, enter the remainder of the question statement in the second “Text” field.

    You can add additional blanks or text by clicking “Add Blank” or “Add Text.”


  4. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  5. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Fill in the Blank question, click “Save and New.”

Matching (MAT)

Matching (MAT) questions require respondents to choose from a set of possible match choices from drop-down lists and correctly pair them with related items. This question type enables you to assess users’ recognition of information and demonstrate comprehension of specific relationships.


SAMPLE:




SETUP:

  1. Select “Matching Questions (MAT)” from the list of question types.

  2. Enter a point value for the entire set of matching and then enter the general question in the “Question Text.”


  3. Set the “Grading Options.”

    Equally weighted – The total point value is divided equally among all possible correct matches. Users receive equally weighted points for each correct answer.

    All or nothing – Users receive the total point value for correctly matching every answer or else they receive none at all.

    Right minus wrong – Users receive points equal to the number of right answer they choose minus the number of incorrect answers they choose. To determine how much each answer is worth, the system takes the total number of points assigned to the question and divides it by the total number of answer options.


  4. Enter the “Choices.” The choices are the words or phrases that will appear on the screen.

    To add additional choices, click “Add Choices.”



  5. Enter the “Matches.” The matches are the words that will appear in the drop-down menu for students to choose.

    You must also specify the correct choice from the previous section. Tip: Matches are randomized during a quiz by default. So, if you enter the matches in the same order that you entered the choices, you will not have to adjust the correct choice menus.

    To add additional matches, click “Add Matches.”



  6. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  7. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Matching question, click “Save and New.”

Ordering (ORD)

Ordering (ORD) questions require respondents to arrange a series of items into a correct  sequence or order.



SAMPLE:




SETUP:

  1. Select “Ordering Question (ORD)” from the list of question types.

  2. Enter a point value for the question and then enter the question in the “Question Text” field.



  3. Set your grading options:

    Equally weighted – The total point value is divided equally among all possible correct matches. Users receive equally weighted points for each correct answer.

    All or nothing – Users receive the total point value for correctly matching every answer or else they receive none at all.

    Right minus wrong – Users receive points equal to the number of right answer they choose minus the number of incorrect answers they choose. To determine how much each answer is worth, the system takes the total number of points assigned to the question and divides it by the total number of answer options.


  4. Enter the list of items and specify the correct order. Note: items are automatically randomized during a quiz.

    To add additional items, click “Add Item.”


  5. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  6. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Ordering question, click “Save and New.”



Arithmetic (2+2)

Arithmetic (2+2) questions enable you to assess users’ knowledge and comprehension of mathematics and number theory. You can ensure each respondent receives a unique question by including set variables that randomly generate numbers within the problem.

Rounding: D2L automatically applies the “Round to Half Even” rounding rule when assessing answers that contains decimal places that end with “5”. There is currently no option to change the rounding rules. Applying the “Round to Half Even” rule, answers with decimal places that end with “5” will round down instead of up.



SAMPLE:





SETUP:

  1. Select “Arithmetic Question (2+2)” from the list of question types.

  2. Enter a point value and then enter the arithmetic question in the “Question Text” field. Enclose all variables in curly braces.

    Example: If you set variables x, y, and z with a Min 1 to Max 5 number range in 1-setp increments, the question “You have {x} green marbles, {y} red marbles, and {z} blue marbles. How many marbles do you have in total?” will randomly generate a ration number (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) for {x}, {y}, and {z}.


  3. Enter the solution’s formula in the “Formula” field. Enclose all variables in curly braces. Example: The formula for the example in Step 2 is {x}+{y}+{z}.


    The formula field supports the following operations, functions, and constants:

    Enumerations

    Description

    +, -, *, /, \, ^

    Basic arithmetic operators

     

    %

    Modulo (remainder) operator

    {x}^{y}

    X to the power of y

    abs({n})

    Absolute value of n

    cos({n})

    Cosine of n (in radians)

    sin({n}

    Since of n (in radians)

    sqr({n})

    Square root of n

    tan({n})

    Tangent of n (in radians)

    log({n})

    Log base 10 of n

    ln({n})

    Log base e of n

    atan({n})

    Inverse tangent of n

    sec({n})

    Secant of n

    cosec({n})

    Cosecant of n

    cotan({n})

    Cotangent of n

    Factorial({n})

    Factorial of n, or (n!)

    exp

    The power of natural log (e)

    pi

    Pi 3.14159 (accurate up to 50 decimal places)

    e

    E 2.71828 (accurate up to 50 decimal places)


  4. Set an “Answer Precision” from the drop-down menu to define the number of acceptable decimal places. Select “enforce precision” if correct answers must contain a specific number of decimal places.

    Select and enter a tolerance level in the “units +/-“ or “percent +/-“ fields to accept near-accurate, estimated, and rounded answers. For example, a percent tolerance +/- of 3 would allow answers to be off by 3%. A units +/- tolerance of 0.5 would allow answers to be off by 0.5 units.


  5. Enter a unit type mm, cm, grams, inches, etc.) in the “Units” field to assess if answers include correct units of measurement. Select a percentage for “Worth % of Points” to assign a weighted points value to the measurement unit.

    Set the “Evaluation Options” for your Units field.

    Case insensitive – Auto-grading searches for a matching character pattern in the answer text with or without letter case correctness.

    Case sensitive – Auto-grading searches for a matching character pattern in the answer text that must have letter case correctness.

    Regular Expression – Auto-grading uses meta-characters to search for one or more matching strings in the answer text’s character pattern. What you set as meta-character parameters helps determine letter case sensitivity. For more information on regular expression, see D2L’s Understanding Regular Expression explanation.


  6. Set your “Variables.”

    Enter a “Name”, “Min” value, and “Max” value for each variable. You can set the number of decimal places in the “Decimal Places” drop down list.

    To add additional variables, click “Add Variable.”

    Enter a number in the “Step” field to set the system’s increment steps as it generates numbers from the rand set by the Min and Max fields.

    Example: If you create variable {x} with Min=100, Max=200 and Step=5, the system will only choose values for {x} that are increments of 5 above 100, up to 200 (105, 110, 115) when generating numbers for your questions.


  7. It’s recommended that you test your formula by clicking “Test” next to the formula.


  8. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  9. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Arithmetic question, click “Save and New.”



Significant Figures (x10)

Significant Figures (x10) questions require respondents to answer in scientific notation and provide solutions that contain a specified number of significant figures. This question type is common for math and science courses. You can ensure each respondent receives a unique question by including set variables that randomly generate scientific notations within the problem.



SAMPLE:




SETUP:

  1. Select “Significant Figures (x10)” from the list of question types.

  2. Enter a point value for the question and then enter the significant figures question in the “Question Text” field. Enclose variables in curly braces to generate numbers randomly.

    Example Question: What is the product of {x} and {y}?


  3. Enter the solution’s formula in the “Formula” field, enclosing variables in curly braces.

    Select how many “Significant Figures” answers must contain. Select a percentage from the “Deduct % of points for incorrect significant figures” drop-down list to assign a weighted point value to the correct number of significant figures.

    Select a “Tolerance” option to accept near accurate, estimated, and rounded answers.

    Enter a unit type (mm, cm, grams, inches, etc.) in the “Units” field to assess if answers include correct units of measurement. Select a percentage from the “Worth % of Points” drop-down list to assign a weighted point value to the measurement unit.

    Set the “Evaluation Options” for your Units field:

    Case insensitive – Auto-grading searches for a matching character pattern in the answer text with or without letter case correctness.

    Case sensitive – Auto-grading searches for a matching character pattern in the answer text that must have letter case correctness.

    Regular Expression – Auto-grading uses meta-characters to search for one or more matching strings in the answer text’s character pattern. What you set as meta-character parameters helps determine letter case sensitivity. For more information on regular expression, see D2L’s Understanding Regular Expression explanation.


  4. Setup your “Variables.” To add additional variables, click “Add Variables.”

    Enter a “Name”, “Max” value, and “Min” value for each variable.

    Enter a number in the “Step” field to set the system’s increment steps as it generates numbers from the range set by the Min and Max fields.


  5. Test you formula by clicking “Test” next to your formula.


  6. Enter “Question Hints” or “Question Feedback” if desired. Remember, if you want students to be able to view hints or feedback, you must enable it during quiz setup.

  7. Click “Save” to return to the quiz questions. To create another Significant Figure question, click “Save and New.”



Likert (LIK) - Survey only!

Likert (LIK) questions measure subjective information such as personal opinions, knowledge, abilities, and attitudes. Likert questions enable you to create surveys that evaluate the intensity of respondents’ feelings towards statements presented to them.

There are seven measurement scales available for Likert questions:

  • One to Five (1 to 5)
  • One to Eight (1 to 8)
  • Agreement Scale (Disagree – Agree)
  • Satisfaction Scale (Dissatisfied – Satisfied)
  • Frequency Scale (Never – Always)
  • Importance Scale (Unimportant – Important)
  • Opposition Scale (Oppose – Support)


Note:
You can only access Likert questions through Surveys and the Question Library. All question type will automatically omit point value and difficulty level when imported into a survey or self-assessment.


SAMPLE:





SETUP:

  1. Select “Likert Question (LIK)” from the list of question types.
  2. Enter the response instructions in the “Introductory Text” field.

    Example: Respond to the following three statements using a scale of Disagree to Agree. Select “N/A” if the statement is not applicable to you.


  3. Select a measurement “Scale.” Also determine if you wish to include the “N/A” option.


  4. Enter each statement in the “Value” fields. You can add additional options by clicking “Add Option.”



  5. Provide any comments and suggestions in the “Question Feedback” field, but remember to enable it in the Submission View settings.
     
  6. Click “Save” to return to the survey setup or click “Save and New” to create another Likert question.